landlord-information

Things you should know and consider

Finding a Suitable Tenant

Securing the right tenant for your property can be a time consuming process.

Inspections are conducted in person and are supervised at all times. Applications are screened for suitability by checking their rental history with the current landlord/agent, confirmation of employment or other income streams, passing the 100 point ID check, a Google search of their name and screening through the Tenancy Information Centre of Australia (TICA) data base.

We notify you that a new tenant’s application has been processed and your approval asked for if required. The tenant pays 1 weeks rent to secure the property and a lease agreement and bond form are then drawn up.

By the first day of the lease the tenant will have paid the balance of 1 weeks rent plus 4 weeks rent for the bond in cleared funds before they are given the keys to the property.

General Insurance

It is advisable to check with your insurance company to make certain your property is adequately covered under their building & contents policy when you have a tenant in place. It is also important to confirm what items and situations (i.e. flooding) are covered, and more importantly, what items or situations are not covered. Some companies will not provide cover for light fittings, curtains/blinds or floor coverings in their building contents policies if the property is tenanted.

Landlord Protection Insurance

We take great care to ensure your experience as the owner of an investment property is as trouble free as possible. However, even the best tenants can be affected by illness, injury or job loss causing them to default on their rent or abandon the property.  Events like earthquakes, fire, floods, burglary or accidents can damage items not covered in your general home insurance policy.

We strongly encourage you to have Landlord Protection Insurance, which usually covers malicious damage, unpaid rent, loss or damage to contents (curtains, carpets, light fittings etc.), legal expenses, public liability, professional fees and more.

Responsibility of the Owner

  • To follow the rules for renting set out in the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.
  • Ensure the premises is fit to live in and kept in a good state of repair (including any inclusions i.e. dishwasher, air conditioner etc.).
  • Ensure the property meets all laws that deal with health and safety.
  • The property is kept reasonably safe and secure.
  • Do not approach, cause a nuisance, or seriously affect the reasonable peace, comfort and privacy of the tenant without giving proper written notification under the Act.

Right of Entry

An owner or his agent may enter the rented premises only after the following notice has been given in writing on an Entry Notice Form 9:

  • In an emergency – No notice required.
  • Routine Inspection  – 7 days
  • Routine Repairs – 24 hours
  • Inspect Repairs – 24 hours
  • Smoke Alarm Compliance – 24 hours
  • Electrical Compliance – 24 hours
  • Show the Premises to a Prospective Tenant or Purchaser – 24 hours
  • Valuation of Premises – 24 hours
  • Abandoned Premises – 24 hours

Security Bonds

Bonds do not normally exceed the equivalent to 4 weeks rent unless the rent is higher than $500 per week. No extra bonds are permitted including a pet bond.

All bond money is held by the RTA and will be refunded to the tenant in full at the end of the lease unless the landlord or agent makes a claim against it.

Selling my property with a Tenant in Place

If the owner decides to sell the premises the tenant must be given a ‘Notice of Lessor’s Intention to Sell’ (Form 10).

When the lessor/agent wishes to show the property to a prospective purchaser they must give the tenant an Entry Notice (Form 9) with at least 24 hours notice before each entry.

If the tenant is on a fixed term agreement they may stay until the end of the agreement and the new owner will become their landlord.

If the tenant is on a periodic agreement and the new owner wants vacant possession the lessor/agent may issue them with a Notice to Leave (Form 12) after the signing of the contract for sale, giving at least 4 weeks notice to vacate.

Swimming Pool Safety Certificate

Properties with a swimming pool or spa need to have a current Pool Safety Certificate. Only inspectors licensed by the Pool Safety Council can issue a certificate and must be renewed every two years. Penalties for noncompliance can be as high as $16,500.

Smoke Alarms

If the owner decides to sell the premises the tenant must be given a ‘Notice of Lessor’s Intention to Sell’ (Form 10).

When the lessor/agent wishes to show the property to a prospective purchaser they must give the tenant an Entry Notice (Form 9) with at least 24 hours notice before each entry.

If the tenant is on a fixed term agreement they may stay until the end of the agreement and the new owner will become their landlord.

If the tenant is on a periodic agreement and the new owner wants vacant possession the lessor/agent may issue them with a Notice to Leave (Form 12) after the signing of the contract for sale, giving at least 4 weeks notice to vacate.

Taxation

As an investor obtaining rental income from your property you are able to claim expenses relating to the investment including management fees, bank fees, repairs and maintenance, improvements, depreciation etc. It is recommended that you talk with you accountant to obtain more information as the rules can change form year to year.

Telephone and Internet Connection

Tenants are responsible for the cost of telephone and internet usage and re-connection fees. However, if the property is new and the telephone line has never been connected, it is the landlord’s responsibility to pay for the initial connection.

Water Costs and Who Pays

With water costs on the increase more owners are asking that the tenants pay for their own water consumption.

From the 1st April 2008, landlords can pass on all water consumption costs provided that the property has an individual water meter and is certified water efficient to a 3 wels rating or higher. The property should be checked by a licensed plumber familiar with the requirements and asked to provide a certificate of compliance. Most strata titled units and townhouses do not have an individual meter.

If the property does have an individual water meter, but is not certified as water efficient, the tenant can be asked to pay for all excess water consumed over 200 kiloliters per annum or 100 kiloliters for a 6 month lease.

The landlord is responsible for all other water related charges.

What is the Residential Tenancies Authority (RTA)?

The RTA administers the Act and is an independent and impartial government organization that assists tenants, lessors and agents. They provide information about your rights and responsibilities, manage bond deposits and refunds. Provide a dispute resolution service and investigate complaints made about tenants, lessors or agents that may have breached the Act.

Where can I find more information regarding my rights and responsibilities?

  • ‘Renting a House or Unit in Queensland’ Form 17a. This booklet can be obtained from the RTA or downloaded from their web site.
  • Residential Tenancies Authority web site: www.rta.qld.gov.au or phone 1300 366 311.
  • The Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.

Owning a rental property can be a challenging experience for both new owners and long-time investment veterans.

Our goal is to provide the highest level of professional service, accurate information and advice while making the ownership of your property as profitable and stress free as possible.

Need more information?

Nikki and Kim are ready and waiting to help you with all your investment questions. Remember at Roxby Property we also offer a COMPLIMENTARY rental appraisal

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